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Propitiation (ἱλάσκομαι)

Propitiation (ἱλάσκομαι) is the act of making compensation, thereby providing a satisfaction. In the Old Testament, propitiation is found in the place between the cherubs on the Ark of the Covenant. The place of propitiation (ἱλαστήριον).

God set forth Christ as a propitiation through His blood to demonstrate His righteousness in the deferring of punishment for previously committed sins, Romans 3:25. Therefore, we are justified out from faith through grace, not through works, because Christ’s death for sin satisfies the righteousness of God in forgiving sins, Romans 3:24. Christ’s propitiatory work not only atones for the sins of those who are saved, but the entire world, 1 John 2:2. Therefore, God is just in permitting unrighteous beings into His presence while He demonstrates an aspect of His character to the spirit beings.

The Apostle John writes that God loved the world in this way, He gave His unique one-of-a-kind Son so that all the ones believing in Him would be saved, John 3:16. His Son made a propitiation for our sins and therefore makes it possible for us to be saved, 1 John 4:10. This is how God loved the world, by giving us a Savior Who was able to satisfy the righteousness of God and provide a sacrifice for the sending away of sin.

Under the Old Testament, The Mosaic Law, God had them build an Ark for the Covenant to reside within and as a place of propitiation for the sins of the people, Exodus 25:10. Often translated as mercy seat, the place between the Cherubim on the Ark was a place of atonement or propitiation, a place of covering (כַּפֹּ֫רֶת kapporet), not of mercy, Exodus 25:17. Either kindness (חֶסֶד kesed), Psalm 23:6, compassions (רַחֲמִים rahamim), […]

Propitiation (ἱλάσκομαι)2024-01-17T06:16:43-08:00

Happy and Joy

Happy (μακάριος) is an attitude of enjoyment and delight, whereas Joy (χαρά) is contentment. In action, joy is rejoicing; however, it is different from exultation (ἀγαλλιάω), Matthew 5:12.

When the magi of the east saw the star of David rise, they knew the King of the Jews was born. They responded to this finding by rejoicing with very great joy because their discovery brought them happiness, Matthew 2:10. Zacharias is informed by an angel that the Lord has heard his supplication for a son. Elizabeth will bear him a boy, and he will have joy and gladness along with many others who will rejoice at his birth, Luke 1:14. In addressing the saints of Philippi, Paul expresses that they are his joy, Philippians 4:1. For they bring him a sense of delight just as the saints in Thessalonica, 1 Thessalonians 2:19, even though Paul has been separated from them through the persecution he was facing. Not only did they receive the gospel of the Christ, but they also took hold of eternal life through obedience to the gospel. During Christ’s ministry, as He proclaimed the gospel of the Kingdom of the Heavens, some of the Jews immediately received the message with joy; however, they were like seeds on stony ground that have no root, so they only endure for a short time, Matthew 4:16. Joy is not emotionally centered because it is also shown by the spirit beings, who do not possess a soul. There is great joy in heaven over one sinner changing his mind, Luke 15:7.

Unlike joy, which is often expressed in rejoicing because of satisfaction, happy is more of a state of mind. Happy is the man to whom the Lord does not […]

Happy and Joy2023-12-21T05:51:30-08:00

Simon the Sorcerer

Seeking to Purchase the Gift from God

Simon was a man in Samaria who practiced magic to astonish the people, through which he claimed to be someone great, Acts 8:9. Therefore, the people, great and small, all paid attention to him, saying that what he was doing was the great inherent ability of God, Acts 8:10. Sorcerer (μαγεύω) is one who practices magic (μαγεία). This is the same type of magic that street performers use today to amaze people and gain financially from them as they seek to be well-known for their skills. Simon was not the only one doing magic to obtain notoriety recorded in Scripture. Elymas, a false prophet who was known as a Sorcerer, stood against Saul and Barnabas, preventing them from speaking the Word of God to the proconsul of Paphos, seeking to turn Sergius Paulus from the faith, Acts 13:6-8. These men used magic to persuade the people that their power was from God and procure a position of high regard for themselves, giving them access to substantial wealth.

When Philip the evangelist came to Samaria proclaiming the gospel of the resurrected Christ, Simon the sorcerer was among those who believed. The signs and wonders that Philip was doing intrigued him, so he continued with Philip after being immersed, Acts 8:13. Although the Samaritans believed in the facts of the Gospel, they had not yet received the Holy Spirit because God was using this as an opportunity to show the Jews that He is accepting the Gentiles into the Church. Therefore, it was not until the Apostles sent Peter and John, who laid their hands on those who believed Philip’s message, that they received the Holy Spirit, Acts 8:16. The […]

Simon the Sorcerer2023-12-14T07:58:18-08:00

Brought to an Intended End (τέλειος)

In First Corinthians chapter thirteen verse ten, Paul writes of a time when a complete thing (τέλειος) will render ineffective that which is out from a part. Due to poor translations and hermeneutics applied to this passage, a lot of confusion has resulted from using “perfect”, especially around the conclusion of the use of specific Spiritual gifts and prophecy within the assembly. The Greek word τέλειος (telios), found in First Corinthians chapter thirteen verse ten, does not carry the same meaning as the English concept of “perfect”; rather, it conveys completion through bringing something to its intended end. Whether or not it is without flaw has to do with what the goal, or intent, was for that thing.

When Scripture articulates the concept of maturity concerning a human, it refers to a person’s lifestyle upon the earth, not in their resurrected state. Otherwise, it indicates completion, such as with the greater and more complete Tabernacle in the heavens that Christ entered into to obtain eternal salvation in Hebrews chapter nine verse eleven. In First Corinthians chapter two verse six, Paul writes that he speaks a wisdom for the mature, not a wisdom of this malignantly evil age. Paul uses the same concept of maturity while addressing the Christians in Jerusalem who went back to living under law and, therefore, were not training their senses to discern what is proper from what lacks in character. Solid food is for the mature, whereas milk is for the inarticulate babbler, Hebrews chapter five verse fourteen. Due to their lack of maturity, they need someone again to teach them the basics of the oracles of God. In First Corinthians chapter fourteen verse twenty, Paul uses τέλειος (telios) for maturity […]

Brought to an Intended End (τέλειος)2023-12-14T08:05:32-08:00
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