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Greek Grammar Rescue

A Collection of Koine Greek Charts, Grammar, and Parts of Speech for the Student of Biblical Greek

Luther Walker

The purpose of this book is to assist students of Koine (Biblical) Greek with studying by combining the first four years of study into one concise and easy to use aid. Within these pages, the student will find every aspect of the Greek language from the forms, to how different parts of the sentences are used. I originally designed this book to provide a way for me to keep the notes and charts of my classes in a compact, concise booklet for studying anywhere at any time. Now that the book is complete, I continue to find it to be an irreplaceable assistant in my continued studies of the Greek language and explaining God’s Word in the Pastorate. My desire is that this book will help other Pastors and saints in their studies as they endeavor to understand and present the Word of God accurately to their congregations, friends, relatives, coworkers, and with all others that God so graciously gives opportunity to share His Word.

© 2017 Luther Walker | All Rights Reserved | ISBN-10: 0-9993211-0-2, ISBN-13: 978-0-9993211-0-2 | This book or any potion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review or scholarly journal.

Greek Grammar Rescue2023-11-25T15:07:19-08:00

Verb

The Greek Verb

The verb is the part of a sentence that expresses the action or state of being. Some verbs require an object to complete the sentence where others do not due to their inherent meaning. Transitive or intransitive is a characteristic of the verb, not expressed or modified by the voice. Transitive verbs take a direct object. Intransitive verbs do not need a direct object to complete their meaning.

Five Identifying Features of the Greek Verb

The Greek verb has five identifying features: Mode (Mood), Tense, Voice, Person, Number.

Mode (Mood)

Represents the way in which the action is perceived. Two viewpoints are expressed: that which is actual and that which is possible.

Tense

Identifies type and time of action. The kind of action is the principle idea involved with the Greek tense, whereas the time of action is secondary. Kinds of actions are continuous, occurring, and completed.

Voice

Indicates how the subject relates to the action or state of the verb.

Active

The subject is producing the action or state expressed by the verb.

Middle

The subject participates in or directly benefits from the result of the action or state expressed in the verb.

Passive

The subject receives the action or state of the verb.

Person and Number

Person and number determine the relation of the subject to the action of the verb. The verb will always agree with its subject in person and number.

Deponent or Defective Verbs

Deponent means “to lay aside” and defective is used to imply that a word has no active voice. However, both terms are inadequate to describe the use of a middle or passive in place of the active voice. The active form did exist; however, through use dropped off because the middle or passive voice by the nature of the word and its use became predominate. However, to say it has “laid aside” its active voice is incorrect and contrary to the history of […]

Verb2023-12-11T12:19:31-08:00

Greek Grammar Rescue

Greek Grammar Rescue

A Collection of Koine Greek Charts, Grammar, and Parts of Speech for the Student of Biblical Greek

Luther Walker

The purpose of this book is to assist students of Koine (Biblical) Greek with studying by combining the first four years of study into one concise and easy to use aid. Within these pages, the student will find every aspect of the Greek language from the forms, to how different parts of the sentences are used. I originally designed this book to provide a way for me to keep the notes and charts of my classes in a compact, concise booklet for studying anywhere at any time. Now that the book is complete, I continue to find it to be an irreplaceable assistant in my continued studies of the Greek language and explaining God’s Word in the Pastorate. My desire is that this book will help other Pastors and saints in their studies as they endeavor to understand and present the Word of God accurately to their congregations, friends, relatives, coworkers, and with all others that God so graciously gives opportunity to share His Word.

© 2017 Luther Walker | All Rights Reserved | ISBN-10: 0-9993211-0-2, ISBN-13: 978-0-9993211-0-2 | This book or any potion thereof may not be reproduced or used in any manner whatsoever without the express written permission of the publisher except for the use of brief quotations in a book review or scholarly journal.

Verbs

Nouns

Adjective

Participles

Prepositions

Postpositives

Clauses

Suffixes And Their Meanings

Greek Grammar Rescue2022-10-11T13:43:03-07:00

Prostration (προσκυνέω)

Prostration (προσκυνέω), the act of lying stretched out on the ground with the face downward, is a profound expression of reverence and compliance. It symbolizes complete dependence and submission to a higher authority, conveying an attitude of deep humility.

During His earthly ministry, Jesus restored a man’s sight on the Sabbath, which caused quite a stir with the ruling religious party. After accusing the man of not being blind, which was refuted by his parents, they again questioned him concerning the healing, especially regarding who performed this act upon him. At that time, the man who was blind did not know who had given him sight; however, even he could see that such a one would be from God. The Pharisees disagreed and cast him out of the synagogue because he was healed on the Sabbath. After hearing what had happened, Jesus found the man and asked him if he believed in the Son of God. Inquiring who the Son of God is, the previously blind man prostrated before Jesus when he became aware He was the one who healed him, John 9:38.

Within our English bibles the word “worship” is predominantly used to translate the word “prostration”; however, “worship” in English does not adequately express the concept of lying stretched out in reverence and compliance because another word in Greek conveys the meaning of giving proper credit for who a person is, which is what worship means. When Paul instructs the saint in 1 Thessalonians 5:17 to pray without ceasing, he uses a word that better communicates the concept of worship instead of to prostrate. Worship (προσευχή) is derived from the concept of speaking out or uttering out loud a wish (εὔχομαι); […]

Prostration (προσκυνέω)2024-07-18T06:09:16-07:00
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