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Immersion (βάπτισμα)

Baptism – (βάπτισμα; βαπτίζω) Immersion. Baptism means “to immerse”. This immersion permanently impacts the object immersed, such as a garment immersed into dye.

The failure to translate this word was done early in the Church’s history through the Latin use of “Babtismus”, which is defined in English as “washing” or “sprinkling”. Having its root in the false religion of Catholicism, the meaning of the word was masked to justify theological religious practices that are not Scripturally based, such as baptizing a child by sprinkling. The issue with this definition is that the Greek Language has specific words for “washing” and “sprinkling”, showing that baptism has a different meaning.

“Washing” (λούω), involves the cleaning of the entire body. Jesus told the disciples in the upper room once a person is washed, they only need to clean their feet (John 13:10), referring to how a Christian deals with sin. We have been washed and regenerated (born again) by the Holy Spirit (Titus 3:5). This washing is through the Word to those of the Church (Ephesians 5:26) and is referring to a complete washing away of sins.

“Sprinkle” (ῥαντισμός; ῥαντίζω) is used six times in Scripture. It is what was done with the blood of animals for cleansing the earthly tabernacle (Hebrews 9:13), which was a shadow of the real temple in Heaven that was cleansed by the sprinkling of Christ’s blood (Hebrews 12:24). It is also used for Christians who have been sprinkled by the blood of Christ in the sanctifying work of the Holy Spirit, 1 Peter 1:2, and cleanses our heart from a malignantly evil conscience (Hebrews 10:22).

“Baptism” (βάπτισμα) is not actually a Christian word by origin, it was used in Koine Greek for a garment dyed, a […]

Immersion (βάπτισμα)2023-11-25T17:43:30-08:00

The Doctrine of Immersion (Baptism)

The doctrine of immersion (baptism) is referring to the fact that we have been immersed into the body of the Christ, a new creation in which Christ is the head and the Church is the body (2 Corinthians 5:17; Ephesians 1:22,23). This immersion frees us from slavery to the sin nature and enables us to work out righteousness in our lives through obedience to God (Romans 6:4). Therefore, understanding this we are to go on to maturity. Treating each other within the Church as equals, learning to feel at ease with who we are in Christ, and living out a life that truly glorifies (that is express a proper opinion) of God, because we have been immersed into the Christ.

The Doctrine of Immersion (Baptism)2023-12-14T08:51:18-08:00

To Gain a Firm Mental Grasp (ἐπίσταμαι)

Having a firm mental grasp or acquiring information is expressed by ἐπίσταμαι (epistamai). Its root means to stand (ιστημι). Therefore, it expresses standing with a firm mental grasp because of the information a person is acquainted with.

In Peter’s denial of Christ, when questioned by a young servant girl if he was with Christ, he adamantly denied it, saying that he neither intuitively knows nor has acquired knowledge concerning Christ, Mark 14:68. After Peter is restored from the attack by Satan that caused him to deny Christ, God uses him to show the Jews that the Gentiles are also being accepted into the Church. In Cornelius’ house, Peter states that they have a firm mental grasp on the fact that it is not permissible for a Jew to fellowship or enter into a place with another nation, Acts 10:28. However before Cornelius sent for Paul, God showed him that he is not to call any man common or unclean and, therefore, Peter came without objection.

During the council in Acts chapter fifteen concerning whether or not the Gentiles should be circumcised and obey the law of Moses, Peter spoke up concerning what God had been doing. The elders and apostles present had acquired knowledge concerning the situation when God instructed Peter to enter into the house of a Gentile so they could hear the gospel. They were neither circumcised nor immersed before the Holy Spirit came upon them in the same manner as He did on the day of Pentecost to show the Jews a sign, Acts 15:5.

When Apollos came to Ephesus, he was mighty in the Scripture; however, he was only familiar with (had a firm mental grasp) the immersion of John, Acts […]

To Gain a Firm Mental Grasp (ἐπίσταμαι)2024-02-15T08:03:08-08:00

Apostle (ἀπόστολος)

An apostle (ἀπόστολος) is a messenger who is sent out on a specific mission; however, unlike a regular messenger who delivers a message, an apostle is sent with a specific task to perform while giving the message.

Christ sent out the 12 apostles to the Jews during His earthly ministry to proclaim the message of the kingdom of the heavens, Matthew 10:5-42. They were not to take any provisions with them for their journey or go into any city of the Gentiles nor to the Samaritans, for they were sent only to the lost sheep of Israel. Herod sent forth men with a specific mission to slay all the children in Bethlehem who were two years old or younger after the Magi left the region, having been warned by a messenger, failing to report where they found the King of the Jews, Matthew 2:16.

In a single act of expressing love towards the inhabited world, God the Father sent the Son to be the Savior of the world, 1 John 4:14. He sent Him on a specific mission so that through Him we should have life, 1 John 4:9. In this we know love, for God sent His Son to be a propitiation for our sins, 1 John 4:10.

When Christ ascended, He gave gifts to men for the edification of the Church to bring us to a oneness of the faith so that we are no longer tossed around like inarticulate babblers by every wind of teaching by the trickery of men, Ephesians 5:8. Of these gifts were the Apostles, Ephesians 5:11. Twelve of them to the Church. These twelve laid down the foundation of the Church, built upon Christ, giving us the entire revelation concerning the […]

Apostle (ἀπόστολος)2023-12-23T11:45:52-08:00

To Reckon (λογίζομαι)

“Reckon” expresses the concept of a determination made by a mathematical process and therefore taking into account or calculates in a logical manner, making a conclusion based upon this process.

In the fulfillment of Scripture, Christ was reckoned (numbered) among the transgressors, Mark 15:28. Even after being examined showed that no unrighteousness was found in Him, He was counted to be a transgressor by the leaders of Israel and the Romans so that they could justify putting Him to death.

The Chief Priests and scribes calculated their response to Jesus’ question concerning if John’s immersion was from men or heaven. In considering this they discussed among themselves the ramifications of saying it was from heaven and what the Messiah’s response would be, concluding to answer that they did not know rather than expose their hypocrisy, Mark 11:31.

One of the craftsmen called Demetrius, a silversmith who made shrines of Diana, called together his fellow tradesmen to stir up the city, for their profits had plummeted as a result of the truth of the gospel of the resurrected Christ taking root in Ephesus. Directing his accusation at Paul, for he had persuaded many people that there are no gods which are made with hands, Demetrius expresses his concern over their trade falling into disrepute so he calls upon them to consider Artemis and her supposed magnificence, Acts 19:26; therefore counting how much they would lose if she was not considered to be glorious.

For those who teach others the law, but then put themselves in a position where they are above the law, Paul encourages them to calculate the evidence that they will not be able to cause themselves to escape the judgment of God for doing the very things […]

To Reckon (λογίζομαι)2023-11-25T07:39:11-08:00
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