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Reviled (λοιδορέω)

“Revile” is to speak in an insulting way towards another.

The Pharisees reviled the blind man that Jesus healed because he questioned if they wanted to become disciples of Christ after they continued to ask him how he was healed, John 9:28. This man was blind from birth and Jesus healed him on the Sabbath as a sign to the Jews that those who do not see will see. After hearing his story, the Pharisees again call him back to recount what happened to them. They revile him because the man who was blind calls them out for not listening to him and the fact that no one has ever been healed in this manner before; therefore, Jesus has to be from God. In response, the Pharisees claim to be Moses’ disciples, insult him, and cast him out of the synagogue.

In Jerusalem, while Paul was being accused by the Jews so that the Romans would put him to death, after stating that he has lived in all good conscience before God, Ananias commanded the ones nearby to strike him. Paul calls him out for his unrighteous action, referring to him as a whitewashed wall. Paul is then rebuked for reviling the High Priest, Acts 23:4. However, Paul was not aware that Ananias was the High Priest at that time and apologetically quotes Scripture, which states they are not to speak bad concerning a ruler of the people, Acts 23:5. Although what Paul stated was not inaccurate, it was intended to be an insult and therefore not appropriate for him to say against the High Priest.

In response to being reviled, Paul speaks well of others, 1 Corinthians 4:11. Just as Christ, when He suffered for righteousness, did […]

Reviled (λοιδορέω)2023-12-23T07:22:36-08:00

Training Our Senses to Know Good and Evil

As Christians we are not under law; therefore, the law does not govern our actions (Romans 6:14). This can be confusing to some because if the Ten Commandments are not the standard, what is? As part of our salvation, we are placed as sons (Ephesians 1:5 having marked off our bounds to the placement of sons). This means we are no longer under law (Galatians 4:1-5). A son is one who is mature and expected to act appropriately, not like a child. Now being in a position before God where we can mature, we are expected to train our senses to know the difference between what is wrong and what is proper.

But the solid food is for the mature, the ones through practice having trained the senses towards discerning proper and wrong (lacking in character). Hebrews 5:14.

The purpose of the gift of Pastor even teacher (Ephesians 4:11) given to the church is to bring us all to a oneness of faith (Ephesians 4:13) so that we are no longer inarticulate babblers. And inarticulate babbler is one who needs milk (Hebrews 5:13) for they cannot handle the meat of the Word of God and are tossed around by every wind of teaching by the trickery of men who seek to deceive the saints (Ephesians 4:14).

Today, let’s grow a little in our understanding. Let’s put off any law we may be trying to apply to ourselves and start to use the freedom we have in Christ to live righteously. That is, stop with the “Do Not” and start being who we are in Christ. God has given us a new mind by which we can discern His Will for our lives (Romans 12:2).

Christ told the disciples in […]

Training Our Senses to Know Good and Evil2023-11-25T08:07:01-08:00

To Gain a Firm Mental Grasp (ἐπίσταμαι)

Having a firm mental grasp or acquiring information is expressed by ἐπίσταμαι (epistamai). Its root means to stand (ιστημι). Therefore, it expresses standing with a firm mental grasp because of the information a person is acquainted with.

In Peter’s denial of Christ, when questioned by a young servant girl if he was with Christ, he adamantly denied it, saying that he neither intuitively knows nor has acquired knowledge concerning Christ, Mark 14:68. After Peter is restored from the attack by Satan that caused him to deny Christ, God uses him to show the Jews that the Gentiles are also being accepted into the Church. In Cornelius’ house, Peter states that they have a firm mental grasp on the fact that it is not permissible for a Jew to fellowship or enter into a place with another nation, Acts 10:28. However before Cornelius sent for Paul, God showed him that he is not to call any man common or unclean and, therefore, Peter came without objection.

During the council in Acts chapter fifteen concerning whether or not the Gentiles should be circumcised and obey the law of Moses, Peter spoke up concerning what God had been doing. The elders and apostles present had acquired knowledge concerning the situation when God instructed Peter to enter into the house of a Gentile so they could hear the gospel. They were neither circumcised nor immersed before the Holy Spirit came upon them in the same manner as He did on the day of Pentecost to show the Jews a sign, Acts 15:5.

When Apollos came to Ephesus, he was mighty in the Scripture; however, he was only familiar with (had a firm mental grasp) the immersion of John, Acts […]

To Gain a Firm Mental Grasp (ἐπίσταμαι)2024-02-15T08:03:08-08:00

To Prune (καθαίρω)

Through the concept of a vine and a vinedresser, Christ explains to the disciples the new relationship the saved will have with Him and God the Father after His resurrection. He is the vine, the source of life for the branches. The Father is the vinedresser. In John 15:2, the vinedresser lifts the branches that do not bear fruit and prunes those producing fruit so they can yield more. Lifting (αἴρω) is a word that means to pick up. Prune (καθαίρω) is derived from lifting (αἴρω). By adding a preposition to the front of the word, the meaning changes from lift to lifting away, or pruning. The intent for pruning is given within the passage. He prunes the branches so they may produce more fruit.
Take up (αἴρω) is found in several forms to emphasize the purpose of lifting. In 1 Corinthians 5:2, it is used with the preposition for “out from”. The saints of Corinth were puffed up and boasting about allowing a man who was blatantly sinning among them. Their response should have been to mourn such activities and remove, lift away, that person from among them. We, as sons of God, are not to keep company with any brother who is a fornicator, covetous, idolator, reviler, drunkard, or extortioner. Instead, these people are to be put away from us for they are malignantly evil, 1 Corinthians 5:10.
Pruning (καθαίρω) is therefore done in the life of a Christian who is producing the fruit of the Spirit by governing his life according to the desires from the Holy Spirit so that he can yield more fruit. Neither lifting (αἴρω) nor pruning (καθαίρω) implies the removal of the branch from the vine.

To Prune (καθαίρω)2024-01-18T05:33:50-08:00

A Gathered of People (δημος)

Demos (δημος) means a gathered people. It is distinct in use from a crowd (ὄχλος) or an assembly (ἐκκλησία). Demos is organized, where a crowd is chaotic.

When the Jews learned of Paul’s success in preaching the Gospel of the risen Christ, they sought out malignantly evil men to cause an uproar in the city. When they came to where they assumed Paul was residing, after not finding him, they grabbed the owner of the house and brought him out to the gathered people, Acts 17:5. Demos (δημος) is not the same concept as an assembly (ἐκκλησία), which describes a group of people brought together for a common reason, such as with the Ephesians gathering because Demetrius and his fellow tradesmen stirred up the city against Paul and the saints in Ephesus because faith in Christ was threatening their profits from selling idols, Acts 19:39.

Peter uses a form of “demos (δημος)”, which means to be a pilgrim – alongside the gathered people. 1 Peter is written to the elect pilgrims of the dispersion of Pontius, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, 1 Peter 1:1. Through his letter, Peter encourages us to abstain from fleshly lusts that war against the soul while we are out among the Gentiles, for we are sojourners and pilgrims in the world, 1 Peter 2:11.

Using the concept of a gathered people, Paul describes what happens to Christians when they pass away before the Lord returns.

Indeed, we are confident and well pleased rather to be absent (out from the gathered people) out from the body and at home (in the gathered people) facing the Lord, 2 Corinthians 5:8.

Although not all saints of the Church will face death, for when Christ returns, those who are […]

A Gathered of People (δημος)2024-01-17T06:10:34-08:00
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