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Regret (μεταμέλομαι)

Regret (μεταμέλομαι) is caused when someone feels sorry or remorse concerning a previous action. It is not equivalent to repent (μετάνοια), which means to change the mind.

When Paul had to write a letter to the saint in Corinth to correct their unbecoming behavior, he was very poignant in his comments. However, even though Paul was sorry that he had to be so hard, he did not regret writing the letter, 2 Corinthians 7:8. Through the letter, he caused them to grieve; however, this type of grief brings a change of mind, not death, 1 Corinthians 7:10.

In one of His encounters with the leaders of Israel, Jesus speaks of two sons who respond in different ways to their father’s request. The first son refused to work in the vineyard; however, after considering his father’s request, he regretted his response and went to work, Matthew 21:29. The second one agreed with the father’s request but did not go. This was to point out the fact that John the Baptist came to the leaders of Israel in righteousness, and even though they did not receive him, the tax collector and harlots did. Seeing their change of mind in response to John’s message should have opened the leader’s eyes; however, they still did not regret rejecting his message, Matthew 21:32.

Judas Iscariot was a thief, John 12:6. He was the only disciple of the twelve who did not believe that Jesus was the Messiah; however, because he handled the purse, he chose to stay with them. This type of attitude led to betraying Christ for thirty pieces of silver. However, his intent was not for Christ to be put to death; rather, he was expecting them to […]

Regret (μεταμέλομαι)2024-02-22T07:13:51-08:00

Hatred (στυγητός)

Hatred (στυγητός) expresses a despicable or loathsome attitude. It is in contrast to indifference (μισέω), which conveys the concept of not caring about the well-being of others unless it benefits you. Hate is a type of attitude likened to how a storm makes the sky appear in the distance: dark, gloomy, and threatening, Matthew 16:3.

“Hateful”, as an adjective, is only used once in scripture in Titus 3:3. In submitting to rulers and authorities so that we are ready in every good work, we are to put away blasphemy as we seek peace and show kindness to all. Not forgetting that in our former manner of life, we were disobedient, malice, and hateful while being indifferent to others. Since hateful and indifference are used together in the same sentence to describe a person’s attitude and activities, they do not carry the same meaning. This is important to note because many of our English versions translate indifference (μισέω) as hatred, thereby masking the actual meaning of indifference. The apostle John writes concerning those who say they love God but are indifferent to their fellow brother in the Lord. Since they are showing indifference to a fellow saint, they cannot be loving God, 1 John 4:20. This is not hatred towards others, but not being concerned about their well-being, for indifference expresses an attitude that is apathetic towards others because you have no particular interest in or concern about them. This cloaking in the meaning of indifference also impacts the saint’s understanding of the world system, for it does not have a loathsome or despicable attitude towards Christians; rather, it is indifferent to them. Therefore, the world system has no issue with using Christianity and Christians for its […]

Hatred (στυγητός)2023-12-14T08:09:33-08:00

Filled and Filling

There are two terms in Scripture used for filling that uniquely describe how something or someone is filled. The differences between these two concepts for filling are very important to understand concerning the Christian life and how the Holy Spirit interacts with us today compared to saints prior to the dispensation of grace.

Pimplemi (πίμπλημι) describes filling in a way that controls or saturates. It is used of the sponge filled with wine given to Christ on the cross, Matthew 27:48, of a King having his servants fill his wedding hall with guests, Matthew 22:10, a woman’s time for giving birth, Luke 1:57, and even the completion of days of service for a Levitical priest, Luke 1:23. All of these occurrences are describing a permeating of what is filled. It is this type of filling that describes how the Holy Spirit interacted with Old Testament saints, such as John the Baptist was mentally controlled by the Holy Spirit from his mother’s womb, Luke 1:15; however, once his ministry had finished the Holy Spirit no longer filled him, which can be seen with him questioning Jesus if He is the One coming, Luke 7:18-20. In the upper room, on the day of Pentecost when the Church began, the Holy Spirit filled (πίμπλημι), mentally controlled, the disciples making it possible for them to speak in other dialects the wonders of God, Acts 2:4. This is not the Spiritual gift of speaking in tongues, which was given to the early Church as a sign to the unbelieving Jews along with other gifts for signs, wonders, confirmation, and edification of the body of the Christ, 1 Corinthians 12:10. The gifts given to the Church are not from a filling of […]

Filled and Filling2023-11-25T07:38:47-08:00

Regret (μεταμέλομαι)

Regret is a word that comes from a combination of “to care about” and “after”. It is used to express being concerned about something after it has been done, which will result in a change of actions.

While Jesus was teaching in the Temple, the Chief priests and elders came to Him questioning by what authority He is teaching. He responded with a story concerning a man and two of his sons who he asked to go and work in the vineyard. The first one said, “No”, but afterwards regretted it and went (Matthew 21:29). He then rightly rebukes them for not believing the testimony of John the Baptist even though the tax collectors and prostitutes did (Matthew 21:32), for they did not regret rejecting John’s testimony even after seeing others accepting it.

After Christ was betrayed, Judas regretted what he had done when he saw that Jesus was condemned to death and returned the money he had made for betraying Christ to the Chief priest and elders (Matthew 27:3). His regret was not that they beat and imprisoned Him, but that He was condemned to death. This is what caused Judas’ to give care again about what he had done.

Paul expressed his regret for how the first letter to the Corinthians saint had to be written, although he did not regret what was written, only that it caused them grief. However, it was necessary for their benefit and to correct the wrongs they were involved in (2 Corinthians 7:8).

When it comes to the oath that God made with Christ to place Him as a priest according to the order of Melchizedek, He has no regret (Hebrews 7:21). God does not regret His oath with Christ. Therefore, […]

Regret (μεταμέλομαι)2023-11-25T08:00:36-08:00
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