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Knit-together (συμβιβάζω)

Knit-together (συμβιβάζω) expresses closely connecting things together in a logical way.

When we go back to the root of this word, without the concept of close together, it is used of prisoners being put onto a ship, Acts 27:6. It is not the same as embarking, which is articulated by ἐμβαίνω as seen in Matthew 8:23. Therefore while putting the prisoners in the ship, the centurion did this in such a way as to ensure they are not mixed with anyone else, not just causing them to get onto the ship. Therefore, it predominantly relates to connecting things together in a logical manner based upon the facts.

After Saul’s encounter with the resurrected Christ on the Damascus road and his time in the desert training to understand what new thing God was doing, he returned to the city. However, this time, rather than seeking to imprison those who followed the way, he returned proclaiming that Jesus is the Christ and was confounding the Jews by knitting together the facts in the Old Testament that prove Jesus is the Messiah, Acts 9:22. Therefore, Paul was properly and logically closely connecting the revelations in the Old Testament concerning Christ to reveal that, in fact, Jesus is the Messiah.

As Paul traveled around spreading the Gospel of the Christ, the Holy Spirit forbade them from entering Asia. Arriving at Troas, Paul is given a vision in the night of a man of Macedonia. Through all of this, Paul logically closely associated what had happened and his vision in the night, concluding that the Lord wanted them to go to Macedonia and proclaim the gospel to them, Acts 16:10.

In 1 Corinthians 2:16, Paul asks a question concerning who has known the mind […]

Knit-together (συμβιβάζω)2023-12-23T06:42:45-08:00

The Inarticulate Babbler – No Longer Tossed Around

And on the one hand God gave the apostles, and on the other hand the prophets, and the evangelist, and the pastors even teachers, towards the equipping of the saints unto a work of service, unto a building up of the body of the Christ, until we all arrive at a oneness of the faith and the full experiential knowledge of the Son of God, unto a mature man, unto a measure of maturity of the fulness of the Christ, in order that we are no longer inarticulate babblers, tossed around and carried about by every wind of teaching by the craftiness of men in cunning scheming of deceit, but while speaking the truth in love growing up unto Him in all things, Who is the head, Christ – Ephesians 4:11-15.

Nepios (νήπιος), is a word that describes a stage in life when we are under governors and tutors while being trained and brought to maturity. The importance of a good education and the integrity of those teaching is very important for the proper growth and maturity of a student. When the teachers fail to speak the truth, and do not hold the students accountable, maturity is never reached.

…always learning and never coming unto a full experiential knowledge of the truth – 2 Timothy 3:7

This is true in secular and religious settings. Today our government schools are intentionally based upon ideology and propaganda that teaches contrary to the truth and causes a lot of young people to be very confused about history, who they are, and basic truths in life. This same type of atmosphere is present in many large and well-known assemblies claiming to be Christians today. In the book of Revelation seven periods of […]

The Inarticulate Babbler – No Longer Tossed Around2023-12-14T08:11:48-08:00

Faith

Scripture defines faith (πίστις) as the substance of that which is hoped for, the conviction of accomplished deeds not seen in Hebrews 11:1. It is therefore not an attitude or belief that is dictated by probability, that is wishful thinking based upon a desire, want, or need; rather, it is a conviction based upon a promise.

Substance is referring to the underlying essence by which something exists. Christ is the exact image of God in the flesh. Through His life the fundamental nature of God was made visible to humans, Hebrews 1:3.

Conviction is the act of presenting evidence to persuade a person’s mind to believe in the truth. This evidence is established upon accomplished deeds that are not seen. We see this demonstrated in the actions of God when He determined to show the heirs of promise the immutability of His determination by giving two immutable facts, it is impossible for God to lie and making an oath based upon His word, Hebrews 6:13-18. The conviction of faith is therefore based upon the facts related to accomplished deeds that God has done.

Therefore, faith is the essence of that which is hoped for, and by the conviction based upon the facts of the promise that hope is based upon, the individual expressing belief will act according to their confidence in the person making the promise.

Many times in Scripture Jesus called out the faith of those around Him, especially of those who would not normally have faith. When a Centurion, a Gentile, asked Jesus to heal his servant, he expressed faith in the fact that Christ is the Messiah promised to the Jews by only asking that Jesus speaks the words, for one who is of authority only […]

Faith2023-12-14T08:12:55-08:00

After These Things (μετὰ ταῦτα)

“After these things” gives us an important anchor in Scripture concerning the timing of events. It is more important during prophecy, but also in other areas we are carried along within the timeline of events by the use of “after these things”.

The first “after these things” we find is with Jesus showing signs and gathering His disciples. After Jesus heals a paralyzed man He found Levi, a tax collector, and says to Him “Follow Me” (Luke 5:23). So we see Christ began showing signs to the Jews before gathering all His disciples.

Christ warning His disciples concerning the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy. They are not to fear those who can kill the body but after these things has no authority, Luke 12:4.

While instructing the apostles, Jesus uses an example of a slave and a master. When the slave is finished with his work, he is not treated in a special way by the master who only after these things eats himself; rather, the slave has simply done what was required (Luke 17:8).

As the Passover was near, Jesus went up to Jerusalem and seeing the money changers in the temple, drove them out. The Jews, seeing this, requested a sign from Jesus where He states tear down this temple and in three days I will raise it up. After these things Jesus and His disciples went into the land of Judea. John 3:22.

While in Cana of Galilee a royal official requested from Jesus to come and heal his son, for he was at the point of death. Jesus stated to the official that his son lives, and the official believed Him. This was the second sign Jesus did in Judea and after these things […]

After These Things (μετὰ ταῦτα)2023-11-25T08:01:45-08:00
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