Need a new search

If you didn't find what you were looking for, try a new search!

The Rule of the Mature

Therefore as many as are mature, we should frame the mind this way, and if anyone of you frames the mind differently, also this the God will reveal to you. Philippians 3:15

The Rule of the Mature2023-12-14T08:54:36-08:00

Self-Control (ἐγκράτεια)

Self-control (ἐγκράτεια) means to have strength over one’s appetites through regulating emotions, thoughts, and behaviors in the face of impulses or temptations.

Self-control is an aspect of the fruit of the Spirit, Galatians 5:23. Since it is a part of the fruit belonging to the Spirit, we cannot obtain it through law or self-effort. Those who seek to be righteous through their works, although having a word of wisdom through self-imposed religion, humility, and the neglecting of the body, do not through these enjoy freedom over the indulgences of the flesh, Colossians 2:23. Self-control is a product of walking by the Spirit; therefore, self-control is an ingredient of the characteristics of Christians who are Spiritual, Acts 24:25.

As we work out our faith, we gain knowledge. To this knowledge, we are to add self-control, through which we can apply godliness to our lives, 2 Peter 1:6. As we continue to mature, we add to godliness a fondness for the brethren that gives place to seeking the best for the ones loved, so the we abound and are not unfruitful or barren in the full experiential knowledge of Jesus Christ our Lord.

Therefore, self-control is a natural result of seeking out and governing our lives by the desires from the Holy Spirit, so that in freedom we maintain strength over our appetites, emotions, thoughts, and behavior in a worthy manner that glorifies God as the Holy Spirit produces the character of Christ through us.

Self-Control (ἐγκράτεια)2024-06-06T06:33:53-07:00

Brought to an Intended End (τέλειος)

In First Corinthians chapter thirteen verse ten, Paul writes of a time when a complete thing (τέλειος) will render ineffective that which is out from a part. Due to poor translations and hermeneutics applied to this passage, a lot of confusion has resulted from using “perfect”, especially around the conclusion of the use of specific Spiritual gifts and prophecy within the assembly. The Greek word τέλειος (telios), found in First Corinthians chapter thirteen verse ten, does not carry the same meaning as the English concept of “perfect”; rather, it conveys completion through bringing something to its intended end. Whether or not it is without flaw has to do with what the goal, or intent, was for that thing.

When Scripture articulates the concept of maturity concerning a human, it refers to a person’s lifestyle upon the earth, not in their resurrected state. Otherwise, it indicates completion, such as with the greater and more complete Tabernacle in the heavens that Christ entered into to obtain eternal salvation in Hebrews chapter nine verse eleven. In First Corinthians chapter two verse six, Paul writes that he speaks a wisdom for the mature, not a wisdom of this malignantly evil age. Paul uses the same concept of maturity while addressing the Christians in Jerusalem who went back to living under law and, therefore, were not training their senses to discern what is proper from what lacks in character. Solid food is for the mature, whereas milk is for the inarticulate babbler, Hebrews chapter five verse fourteen. Due to their lack of maturity, they need someone again to teach them the basics of the oracles of God. In First Corinthians chapter fourteen verse twenty, Paul uses τέλειος (telios) for maturity […]

Brought to an Intended End (τέλειος)2023-12-14T08:05:32-08:00

Scandalize (σκανδαλίζω)

Scandalize is to shockingly offend a person’s moral sensibility.

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus speaks of a man scandalizing himself when he looks at a woman for the purpose of desiring her for adultery, for in doing so he has already committed adultery in his heart, Matthew 5:28.  The kingdom of the heavens is what Jesus is preaching. After the Messiah comes, is cut off, the Temple is desecrated by Satan, and the Messiah returns in glory, He sets up a Kingdom that will last for 1000 years, Daniel 9:24-27. In setting up this kingdom, God makes a new covenant with Israel in which He writes His law within their heart, Jeremiah 31:33. In the Sermon on the Mount Jesus is giving instructions concerning the rules of this kingdom, not for today. This man scandalizes himself because he intentionally violated the law of God that is written in his heart by acting upon a thought to desire another woman by glancing at her for this purpose. Unlike under the Mosaic Law where the act of adultery, which is a sin, would be punished, he is held liable for scandalizing himself by using his members in a way that is contrary to what he knows is right even though the physical act of adultery has not been committed, for sin and scandalizing are not the same thing. This is not referring to today, for we are in a period of time in which we must learn the law of God, which for the Church is to live by grace through faith. Therefore, such desires, although we may strongly desire not to have them, do not scandalize us, for we expect to have to deal with […]

Scandalize (σκανδαλίζω)2023-12-23T11:33:57-08:00

Submission (ὑποτάσσω)

The Scriptural concept expressed by the word translated as “submission” communicates a type of yielding that relates to being under the authority of another in an orderly fashion. This has a military emphasis along with governmental structures, for both require submission in order to bring order and provide benefits to those under their authority. This is not the same concept as serving as a slave and therefore submitting is not servitude, Titus 2:9. In many cases, this type of submission has to be done voluntarily.

Christ submitted to His earthly parents because it was the right thing to do according to the law and righteousness, Luke 2:51. He was in the right in what He was doing, but at that time Joseph and Mary did not understand that Jesus would be about His Father’s business, for He had stayed in the Temple listening and questioning the teachers, so He submitted and went back to Nazareth, for the benefit it would bring to them.

A fleshly framed mind will not submit itself to the law of God, for it does not have the ability to submit. Romans 8:7. This is not referring to the Mosaic Law, but the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus, Romans 8:2. A carnal mind will want to submit to the Mosaic Law so that it can justify itself through works, for it is not out from faith, Galatians 3:12, but a Christian is to live out from faith, Galatians 3:11, which requires a mind framed on the Spirit, Romans 8:5. Therefore, when we are Spiritual we will submit to the law of the Spirit of life in Christ Jesus which will produce righteousness in our lives through faith. We see […]

Submission (ὑποτάσσω)2023-11-25T07:39:00-08:00
Go to Top