Need a new search

If you didn't find what you were looking for, try a new search!

Training Our Senses to Know Good and Evil

As Christians we are not under law; therefore, the law does not govern our actions (Romans 6:14). This can be confusing to some because if the Ten Commandments are not the standard, what is? As part of our salvation, we are placed as sons (Ephesians 1:5 having marked off our bounds to the placement of sons). This means we are no longer under law (Galatians 4:1-5). A son is one who is mature and expected to act appropriately, not like a child. Now being in a position before God where we can mature, we are expected to train our senses to know the difference between what is wrong and what is proper.

But the solid food is for the mature, the ones through practice having trained the senses towards discerning proper and wrong (lacking in character). Hebrews 5:14.

The purpose of the gift of Pastor even teacher (Ephesians 4:11) given to the church is to bring us all to a oneness of faith (Ephesians 4:13) so that we are no longer inarticulate babblers. And inarticulate babbler is one who needs milk (Hebrews 5:13) for they cannot handle the meat of the Word of God and are tossed around by every wind of teaching by the trickery of men who seek to deceive the saints (Ephesians 4:14).

Today, let’s grow a little in our understanding. Let’s put off any law we may be trying to apply to ourselves and start to use the freedom we have in Christ to live righteously. That is, stop with the “Do Not” and start being who we are in Christ. God has given us a new mind by which we can discern His Will for our lives (Romans 12:2).

Christ told the disciples in […]

Training Our Senses to Know Good and Evil2023-11-25T08:07:01-08:00

Lift up (αἴρω)

αἴρω (airo) means to lift up or bear. It is used for picking up a bed, baskets, fish, money, people, and many other objects. Therefore, by lifting up, you are bearing the weight. When not referring to an object, it is used of justice being stolen, the loss of life, and the lifting of sin.

When Christ informed a lame man that because his sins were forgiven, he could stand up and walk, the Jewish scribes said He was committing blasphemy. However, Jesus explained to them that He said, “The man’s sins are sent away.” so they would understand that He has the authority to forgive sins. Then He turned to the man and instructed him to lift up his bed and go home, to which the man did, Matthew 9:2-7.

Christ was manifested to lift our sins, 1 John 3:5. Through His work on the cross, while we were dead in our trespasses and sins, the Father made us alive in Christ, sending away (forgiving) our trespasses after wiping out the handwritten dogma against us, lifting it out of the way by nailing it to the cross, Colossians 2:14. Therefore, in Christ, the law has been completed and all who are in the Christ are counted to be righteous and not under the law, Romans 6:14. Just as a child is no longer under tutors and governors when he has completed his training, Galatians 4:1-2, so is a Christian when it comes to law. We are no longer to be inarticulate babblers that need the law to guide us. Instead, as sons, we must train our senses to know good and evil, Hebrews 5:14.

In response to Pilate seeking to release Jesus, for Pilate found nothing worthy […]

Lift up (αἴρω)2023-12-28T05:31:48-08:00

Brought to an Intended End (τέλειος)

In First Corinthians chapter thirteen verse ten, Paul writes of a time when a complete thing (τέλειος) will render ineffective that which is out from a part. Due to poor translations and hermeneutics applied to this passage, a lot of confusion has resulted from using “perfect”, especially around the conclusion of the use of specific Spiritual gifts and prophecy within the assembly. The Greek word τέλειος (telios), found in First Corinthians chapter thirteen verse ten, does not carry the same meaning as the English concept of “perfect”; rather, it conveys completion through bringing something to its intended end. Whether or not it is without flaw has to do with what the goal, or intent, was for that thing.

When Scripture articulates the concept of maturity concerning a human, it refers to a person’s lifestyle upon the earth, not in their resurrected state. Otherwise, it indicates completion, such as with the greater and more complete Tabernacle in the heavens that Christ entered into to obtain eternal salvation in Hebrews chapter nine verse eleven. In First Corinthians chapter two verse six, Paul writes that he speaks a wisdom for the mature, not a wisdom of this malignantly evil age. Paul uses the same concept of maturity while addressing the Christians in Jerusalem who went back to living under law and, therefore, were not training their senses to discern what is proper from what lacks in character. Solid food is for the mature, whereas milk is for the inarticulate babbler, Hebrews chapter five verse fourteen. Due to their lack of maturity, they need someone again to teach them the basics of the oracles of God. In First Corinthians chapter fourteen verse twenty, Paul uses τέλειος (telios) for maturity […]

Brought to an Intended End (τέλειος)2023-12-14T08:05:32-08:00

Testing for Approval (δοκιμάζω)

Testing for approval (δοκιμάζω) is to make a critical examination of a person or thing to determine its authenticity, drawing a conclusion about its worth. Therefore, it is testing to establish whether or not there is something of value within who or what is put to the test.

Today, the wrath of God is upon all ungodliness and those holding down the truth in unrighteousness, for they consider the knowledge of God to be of no value and are therefore given over to a mind that, when tested, fails because it is found to be full of unrighteousness, Romans 1:28. This lack of worth is seen in the conclusions that this type of unapproved mind makes, for they go against the facts presented and are not base on reality. Such as a man who claims there is no God; however, he is fully aware that the universe is more expansive than humans have currently examined, and therefore, making such a statement shows that his conclusions are not of any value. Or a scientist who claims humans came from evolution. A hypothesis that is its own worst enemy, for within its declarations, it ignores the facts and presents evidence for support that is contrary to its own theories, because the evidence actually shows that humans were created. Therefore, the mind can be in such a state from the result of rejecting truth and reality that when put to the test for approval, it fails.

A Jew who claims to rest upon the law and makes his boast in God, asserting he knows His desirous will and is able to discern for good all things for he is instructed in the law, yet breaks the very rules he states […]

Testing for Approval (δοκιμάζω)2023-12-23T06:39:18-08:00

Knit-together (συμβιβάζω)

Knit-together (συμβιβάζω) expresses closely connecting things together in a logical way.

When we go back to the root of this word, without the concept of close together, it is used of prisoners being put onto a ship, Acts 27:6. It is not the same as embarking, which is articulated by ἐμβαίνω as seen in Matthew 8:23. Therefore while putting the prisoners in the ship, the centurion did this in such a way as to ensure they are not mixed with anyone else, not just causing them to get onto the ship. Therefore, it predominantly relates to connecting things together in a logical manner based upon the facts.

After Saul’s encounter with the resurrected Christ on the Damascus road and his time in the desert training to understand what new thing God was doing, he returned to the city. However, this time, rather than seeking to imprison those who followed the way, he returned proclaiming that Jesus is the Christ and was confounding the Jews by knitting together the facts in the Old Testament that prove Jesus is the Messiah, Acts 9:22. Therefore, Paul was properly and logically closely connecting the revelations in the Old Testament concerning Christ to reveal that, in fact, Jesus is the Messiah.

As Paul traveled around spreading the Gospel of the Christ, the Holy Spirit forbade them from entering Asia. Arriving at Troas, Paul is given a vision in the night of a man of Macedonia. Through all of this, Paul logically closely associated what had happened and his vision in the night, concluding that the Lord wanted them to go to Macedonia and proclaim the gospel to them, Acts 16:10.

In 1 Corinthians 2:16, Paul asks a question concerning who has known the mind […]

Knit-together (συμβιβάζω)2023-12-23T06:42:45-08:00
Go to Top