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To Gain a Firm Mental Grasp (ἐπίσταμαι)

Having a firm mental grasp or acquiring information is expressed by ἐπίσταμαι (epistamai). Its root means to stand (ιστημι). Therefore, it expresses standing with a firm mental grasp because of the information a person is acquainted with.

In Peter’s denial of Christ, when questioned by a young servant girl if he was with Christ, he adamantly denied it, saying that he neither intuitively knows nor has acquired knowledge concerning Christ, Mark 14:68. After Peter is restored from the attack by Satan that caused him to deny Christ, God uses him to show the Jews that the Gentiles are also being accepted into the Church. In Cornelius’ house, Peter states that they have a firm mental grasp on the fact that it is not permissible for a Jew to fellowship or enter into a place with another nation, Acts 10:28. However before Cornelius sent for Paul, God showed him that he is not to call any man common or unclean and, therefore, Peter came without objection.

During the council in Acts chapter fifteen concerning whether or not the Gentiles should be circumcised and obey the law of Moses, Peter spoke up concerning what God had been doing. The elders and apostles present had acquired knowledge concerning the situation when God instructed Peter to enter into the house of a Gentile so they could hear the gospel. They were neither circumcised nor immersed before the Holy Spirit came upon them in the same manner as He did on the day of Pentecost to show the Jews a sign, Acts 15:5.

When Apollos came to Ephesus, he was mighty in the Scripture; however, he was only familiar with (had a firm mental grasp) the immersion of John, Acts […]

To Gain a Firm Mental Grasp (ἐπίσταμαι)2024-02-15T08:03:08-08:00

Obtaining by Experience Something Happening (τυγχάνω)

To obtain by experience something happening (τυγχάνω) expresses the concept of hitting the mark or attaining; therefore, that which has occurred or been accomplished. However, it does not convey the idea of something a person seeks to obtain or gain through effort. Instead, it is when something happens; therefore, they have acquired it.

When Jesus spoke of a man who was on his way to Jerusalem from Jericho, it happened to him that thieves stripped, wounded, and left him half dead, Luke 10:29. This was not something that the man sought to attain, in the sense of seeking out. Rather, this happened to him.

In attempting to deceive Jesus into saying something by which they could accuse Him, the Jews question Him about a woman who had seven brothers, who each died without a child. Therefore, as was customary, she became the wife of each brother to pass on their seed. They inquired whose wife she would be in the resurrection. In response, Jesus states that those who are worthy of the age have attained the resurrection out from the dead and, therefore, do not marry, for they are like the angels in this matter, Luke 20:35. The resurrection out from the dead has happened to them.

In Ephesus, Paul taught in the school of Tyrannus for two years. During this time, it happened to Paul that God worked miracles through him so that all of Asia heard of the word of the Lord Jesus, both Jew and Gentile, Acts 19:11. In seeking to persuade Felix to put Paul to death, Terullus speaks of the peace that has happened to them under his leadership, Acts 24:2. Experiencing something happening can relate to obtaining care, such […]

Obtaining by Experience Something Happening (τυγχάνω)2024-01-25T11:37:15-08:00

A Gathered of People (δημος)

Demos (δημος) means a gathered people. It is distinct in use from a crowd (ὄχλος) or an assembly (ἐκκλησία). Demos is organized, where a crowd is chaotic.

When the Jews learned of Paul’s success in preaching the Gospel of the risen Christ, they sought out malignantly evil men to cause an uproar in the city. When they came to where they assumed Paul was residing, after not finding him, they grabbed the owner of the house and brought him out to the gathered people, Acts 17:5. Demos (δημος) is not the same concept as an assembly (ἐκκλησία), which describes a group of people brought together for a common reason, such as with the Ephesians gathering because Demetrius and his fellow tradesmen stirred up the city against Paul and the saints in Ephesus because faith in Christ was threatening their profits from selling idols, Acts 19:39.

Peter uses a form of “demos (δημος)”, which means to be a pilgrim – alongside the gathered people. 1 Peter is written to the elect pilgrims of the dispersion of Pontius, Galatia, Cappadocia, Asia, and Bithynia, 1 Peter 1:1. Through his letter, Peter encourages us to abstain from fleshly lusts that war against the soul while we are out among the Gentiles, for we are sojourners and pilgrims in the world, 1 Peter 2:11.

Using the concept of a gathered people, Paul describes what happens to Christians when they pass away before the Lord returns.

Indeed, we are confident and well pleased rather to be absent (out from the gathered people) out from the body and at home (in the gathered people) facing the Lord, 2 Corinthians 5:8.

Although not all saints of the Church will face death, for when Christ returns, those who are […]

A Gathered of People (δημος)2024-01-17T06:10:34-08:00

Vigilant (γρηγορέω)

In 1 Peter 5:8, we are instructed to be watchful because our adversary, the Devil, roars around seeking whom he may swallow up. Vigilant (γρηγορέω) means to watch; be on alert for danger.

On his way to Jerusalem, Paul takes the opportunity to stop in Ephesus to encourage the Pastors to shepherd the flock of God while taking heed for themselves, Acts 20:28. When he is gone, he is aware that savage wolves will come in among them, Acts 20:39. Even some of their own will draw away disciples after themselves, rejecting the truth and seeking the glory of men, Acts 20:30. Therefore, they are to be on alert, for Paul has warned them of the dangers for the past three years, Acts 20:31. This assembly listened to Paul’s instruction. They tested those who claimed to be apostles and were not, finding them liars. They kept watch in their work, hard labor, and patience, not bearing things that were wrong. However, in doing so, they lost their love for the brethren, Revelation 2:4. We are to remain on guard for false teachers while being cautious not to fall into the same trap as the saints in Ephesus and lose our love for fellow saints.

After rebuking and exhorting the saints of Corinth, Paul encourages them to be vigilant and stand firm in the faith. Rather than being carnal, they are to do all things out from love, 1 Corinthians 16:13. They are to welcome those who are doing the work of the Lord and pay attention to the dangers of false apostles, who had infiltrated their assemblies and caused a lot of spiritual damage. Still today, their impact is felt among many assemblies that are focused on […]

Vigilant (γρηγορέω)2023-12-22T06:26:33-08:00

In One Accord (ὁμοθυμαδόν)

“In one accord” (ὁμοθυμαδόν) is a derivative of anger (θυμος), which expresses an inner burning heat combined with homogenize. By merging “thumos” (θυμος) with “same” (ομοιος), “in one accord” (ὁμοθυμαδόν) does not hold onto the concept of anger; rather, it only retains the intensity that thumos (θυμος) expresses.

This together intensity can be seen with those who do not want to hear the truth, Acts 7:57, and those who believed because of the signs and wonders being done through the Apostles at the beginning of the Church, Acts 8:6. In the secular realm “in one accord (ὁμοθυμαδόν)” is used of the people of Tyre and Sidon coming to Herod to retain peace, for their country was supplied with food from Herod, Acts 12:20. We also encounter this concept when Gallio was proconsul in Achaia, the Jews in one accord rose up against Paul, for they were angry that he was having such success with teaching the Jewish people about the resurrected Christ, along with all the Gentiles that were coming to salvation through the gospel Paul was proclaiming. They express their intense togetherness against Paul to Gallio, who dismisses them because it is not a matter of wrongdoing or a wicked crime being committed, Acts 18:12. This act from Gallio finally gave Paul time to rest from the persecution by the Jews. As the gospel of Christ spread through Ephesus, the silversmith Demetrius, whose primary business was selling idols of Diana, stirred up the city because the prosperity of the gospel of Christ was so predominant that it negatively impacted his business. Demetrius persuaded the other silversmiths of their dilemma, and in their wrath, they confused the city as they all, in one accord, rushed into […]

In One Accord (ὁμοθυμαδόν)2023-12-14T08:09:58-08:00
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