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A Doer of Wrong (κακοποιός)

There are two types of evil described in Scripture that are often not distinguished in many English translations. The first kind of evil (κακός) expresses someone who is doing wrong, doing that which lacks in character. The second form of evil (πονηρός) is the person spreading their erroneous ways to others. These expect and encourage others to participate in their wicked ways; hence, they are malignantly evil. A doer of wrong (κακοποιός) describes the character of a person who is known to do things in an untruthful, deceptive, or corrupt manner; a willingness to do things in a way they know is not correct to gain or to take advantage for themselves. In contrast to this type of evil is the concept of doing what is proper, which produces beneficial works rather than causing harm and calamity.

When the Jews sought to have Pilate put Jesus to death, they delivered Him over to Pilate as one who is a doer of wrong. However, Pilate found nothing in Jesus’ actions to indicate this; therefore, he told them to take Jesus and judge Him by their laws. However, the Romans did not allow the Jews to put someone to death; therefore, they required Pilate’s assistance to crucify Jesus, John 18:30-31. By continuing to hold Jesus, and ultimately fulfilling the desires of the Jews, both Pilate and the Jewish leaders are the ones who are actually doers of wrong, for they knew that Jesus had done no wickedness, yet still had Him put to death.

When it comes to the behavior of Christians, we are to abstain from fleshly lusts that war against our emotions (soul) while having a proper conduct among those who are not saved. When they speak […]

A Doer of Wrong (κακοποιός)2023-12-14T08:09:06-08:00

To Discern (ἀνακρίνω)

As a derivative of the word for judge, discern expresses the careful study of a question, and is often used in a judicial hearing.

After discerning if Jesus was guilty, Pilate’s response to the Chief Priest and rulers of Israel was that he found no fault in Christ, whom they accused of misleading the people. Not only did he find no blame, but also Herod sent Him back to Pilate for Christ had done nothing worthy of death, Luke 23:13-15. Before the rulers and elders, Peter calls them out for having Christ put to death because he and John were being examined concerning a good deed done to a helpless man, Acts 4:8-10. After killing James and seeing that it pleased the Jewish leaders, Herod locks up Peter so he can continue putting the disciples to death after the days of Unleavened Bread were over, Acts 12:2-3. However, God sent a messenger during the night to release Peter from prison. In the morning, when the guards found that Peter was not in the prison, they were examined and put to death for failing to secure their prisoner, Acts 12:19.

Outside of a judicial setting, discern is used concerning what a person is speaking or how they are acting. The Jews of Berea were high-born, unlike those of Thessalonica. Therefore, they were able to examine the Scripture concerning what Paul was stating to them about the Christ, for they could afford personal copies of the scrolls. As a result of their access to Scripture, many believed what Paul was proclaiming, Acts 17:11. When it comes to discerning the things of the Spirit, they cannot be examined by those who are carnal, for the fleshly mind is not subject […]

To Discern (ἀνακρίνω)2023-12-23T07:16:29-08:00

Reviled (λοιδορέω)

“Revile” is to speak in an insulting way towards another.

The Pharisees reviled the blind man that Jesus healed because he questioned if they wanted to become disciples of Christ after they continued to ask him how he was healed, John 9:28. This man was blind from birth and Jesus healed him on the Sabbath as a sign to the Jews that those who do not see will see. After hearing his story, the Pharisees again call him back to recount what happened to them. They revile him because the man who was blind calls them out for not listening to him and the fact that no one has ever been healed in this manner before; therefore, Jesus has to be from God. In response, the Pharisees claim to be Moses’ disciples, insult him, and cast him out of the synagogue.

In Jerusalem, while Paul was being accused by the Jews so that the Romans would put him to death, after stating that he has lived in all good conscience before God, Ananias commanded the ones nearby to strike him. Paul calls him out for his unrighteous action, referring to him as a whitewashed wall. Paul is then rebuked for reviling the High Priest, Acts 23:4. However, Paul was not aware that Ananias was the High Priest at that time and apologetically quotes Scripture, which states they are not to speak bad concerning a ruler of the people, Acts 23:5. Although what Paul stated was not inaccurate, it was intended to be an insult and therefore not appropriate for him to say against the High Priest.

In response to being reviled, Paul speaks well of others, 1 Corinthians 4:11. Just as Christ, when He suffered for righteousness, did […]

Reviled (λοιδορέω)2023-12-23T07:22:36-08:00

Scandalize (σκανδαλίζω)

Scandalize is to shockingly offend a person’s moral sensibility.

In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus speaks of a man scandalizing himself when he looks at a woman for the purpose of desiring her for adultery, for in doing so he has already committed adultery in his heart, Matthew 5:28.  The kingdom of the heavens is what Jesus is preaching. After the Messiah comes, is cut off, the Temple is desecrated by Satan, and the Messiah returns in glory, He sets up a Kingdom that will last for 1000 years, Daniel 9:24-27. In setting up this kingdom, God makes a new covenant with Israel in which He writes His law within their heart, Jeremiah 31:33. In the Sermon on the Mount Jesus is giving instructions concerning the rules of this kingdom, not for today. This man scandalizes himself because he intentionally violated the law of God that is written in his heart by acting upon a thought to desire another woman by glancing at her for this purpose. Unlike under the Mosaic Law where the act of adultery, which is a sin, would be punished, he is held liable for scandalizing himself by using his members in a way that is contrary to what he knows is right even though the physical act of adultery has not been committed, for sin and scandalizing are not the same thing. This is not referring to today, for we are in a period of time in which we must learn the law of God, which for the Church is to live by grace through faith. Therefore, such desires, although we may strongly desire not to have them, do not scandalize us, for we expect to have to deal with […]

Scandalize (σκανδαλίζω)2023-12-23T11:33:57-08:00

Wrath (ὀργή)

Wrath(ὀργή) is an outward expression of anger.

There are many times recorded in Scripture and human history of God’s wrath coming upon a people which brought their destruction, such as with Sodom and Gomorrah. Therefore, the concept of the wrath of God is often focused on the coming tribulation period, in which His wrath will be poured out in full upon the ungodly, Revelation 11:18, or swift destruction coming upon the unrighteous. However, this is not the only way in which the wrath of God is manifested. An aspect of God’s wrath is being displayed today upon the ungodly and unrighteous men who hold down the truth in unrighteousness, Romans 1:18. God is permitting them to continue in their corrupt ways, turning them over to an unapproved mind and to the uncleanness of the lust of their hearts to dishonor their bodies among themselves, receiving in themselves the punishment for such an immoral lifestyle, and filling up to the full their judgment. Therefore, in reality, they are not getting away with their corruption. This is in stark contrast to how God deals with a Christian who is acting in an unbecoming way. He will discipline us, allowing sickness, being crippled, and even death if we continue in a sinful lifestyle, for He will not allow us to be condemned with the world; therefore, when we are judged we are child-trained to correct our actions, 1 Corinthians 11:30-32. As Christians, we are not appointed unto any quality of God’s wrath, 1 Thessalonians 5:9. However, those who reject the truth are by nature the children of wrath, Ephesians 2:3.

Although the wickedness of this world today makes us very angry, especially when they lie, cheat, and use deception and […]

Wrath (ὀργή)2023-11-25T07:39:30-08:00
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